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Posts tagged ‘Microsoft Windows’

Download and Install BitDefender Antivirus for your Linux Install Free

One great advantage of using Linux (Ubuntu) is the fact that you don’t really have to worry about security and hence viruses. However, this does not mean that you should not use an anti-virus on your Ubuntu machine. Especially when you can get a good anit-virus for free. BitDefender for Unices is one such anti-virus solution for Linux and you can get it for free. Let’s see how to get a free license of BitDefender anti-virus for your Ubuntu machine and how to install it on your Ubuntu machine.

BitDefender Antivirus Scanner for Unices is a versatile on-demand scanner built for Linux and FreeBSD systems. It provides antivirus and antispyware scanning for both UNIX-based and Windows-based partitions.

BitDefender Antivirus Scanner for Unices is highly customizable and capable of script and extension-based integration with various applications such as file managers and mail clients.

Get a free home license for BitDefender
Before we download and install BitDefender on Ubuntu, let’s first get a free license copy of BitDefender. Please remember that the free copy of BitDefender is only for non-commercial home usage. In case you want to use it for business purpose please get a valid license. In order to request a free license go to the following page:
http://www.bitdefender.com/site/Products/ScannerLicense/

Fill in the information and accept the license agreement to get the license key to your email.

Download Free BitDefender Antivirus for Linux

  1. On the following page, click download, enter your details to download the free BitDefender antivirus:
    http://www.bitdefender.com/PRODUCT-80-en–BitDefender-Antivirus-Scanner-for-Unices.html
  2. Once you have filled the information the download link will be sent to your email address.
  3. Click the download link that you received in your email and click BitDefender Antivirus scanner for Unices (Linux, FreeBSD).
  4. On the next page click Download.
  5. Click EN_FR_BR_RO/ and click Linux on the following page.
  6. You’ll see many links on the page. Depending on the version of Linux and your OS (32 or 64 bit), you can download the files. In our case we’ll download the following file:
    BitDefender-Antivirus-Scanner-7.6-4.linux-gcc4x.i586.deb.run

Install the downloaded BitDefender anti-virus

  1. Hit Alt+F2 to bring up the run prompt. Type “gnome-terminal” to open a terminal window.
  2. Go to the directory where you download the file (In my case it is MyDownloads).
    cd MyDownloads
  3. Type the following command
    sudo sh BitDefender-Antivirus-Scanner-7.6-4.linux-gcc4x.i586.deb.run
  4. You’ll be prompted with the end user licence agreement. At the end of the license type “accept” (without quotes). This will begin the installation of BitDefender antivirus on your machine.

Installing BitDefender on Ubuntu

Running Bitdefender

    1. After you have successfully installed the anti-virus go to Applications->System Tools->BitDefender Scanner to see the anti-virus in action.
    2. Enter the free key that you requested and received in your email to get the free 1 year license.

entering BitDefender key

  1. All that is left is to update your anti-virus and to run a scan.

We hope this will make your Ubuntu installation better secured.

This article was written by Vivek Kumar from LinuxHub.net, a blog focused on Linux tutorials (how-to’s), technology and news.

Yes Virginia, Apple’s really do get viruses! Apple Hit by Botnet Trojan, Proves Mac is Vulnerable

Apple computer users have often felt their operating system was less vulnerable to attack than the average PC and for years they were right. However a new virus called Flashback may be proving that Apple, the Mercedes of the computer world, can be just as vulnerable to botnets and trojans as the rest of the computer world. So download the patches Apple made last week, download some anti-virus software and prepare for invasion.

Best Linux Games of GDC 2012

Just because you’re running Linux doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice playing good games. http://bit.ly/follownix Check out this video from this year’s Game Developer’s Conference to see how games for Linux don’t have to suck. While AAA games are still mostly available for Windows, indie deveolopers are pushing the envelope when it comes to native linux games.

Windows 8 Insider Tips!

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Want to get the most out of Windows 8 Consumer Preview? Let’s talk about the new Task Manager, Storage Space, Paul Thurrott‘s primer on customizing your Windows 8 start page, who shouldn’t upgrade to Win8…. and show off Windows 8 Versions Explained, which explains the EIGHT versions of Win8 we expect to see!

Newest WikiLeaks release are ‘spy files’ which show global surveillance industry

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange launched the website’s new project Thursday, the publication of hundreds of files it claims shows a global industry that gives governments tools to spy on their citizens.

Fix a Windows Infection Using Linux

By Katherine Noyes
Mon, October 25, 2010

PC World — If you use Linux on your company’s desktop or server computers, you’re already familiar with many of the security advantages the open source operating system offers over its Windows and Mac rivals. What many people don’t realize, however, is that Linux can also be used to rescue a computer that has been crippled by malware.

Malware is a frequent occurrence in the Windows world, in particular, and it can be devastating. When a Windows virus strikes, not only can it become difficult or even impossible to continue using the affected machine, but it can be dangerous as well, since prolonged use can further the infection.

That’s where Linux can be a life-saver. Without ever having to install the free alternative, you can still use it temporarily on a PC to get rid of any infection. Here’s how.

1. Get a LiveCD or Live USB

LiveCDs and USBs are a wonderful thing in the Linux world because they let you boot a machine directly from the CD or USB stick without ever having to access the computer’s boot records. Not only are they a great way to take Linux for a test-drive, but they can also be put to work when Windows can’t.

By far the fastest way to get a LiveCD or USB is to download the .iso file of the Linux distribution you’d like to use and then burn it onto a CD or USB stick. Since Ubuntu is the most popular distribution out there, I’ll go withMaverick Meerkat–the latest version of the software–for this example.

Ubuntu can be downloaded from the project’s Website for use on a LiveCD or USB; download links for other distributions can be found listed onFrozenTechUNetbootin is another nice option if you want to go the USB route, which tends to run much faster.

Of course, to take either of these options you’ll have to have a working, Internet-connected computer. If you don’t, or if your Internet connection is slow, you may want to order a LiveCD or USB via snail mail. OSDisc andLinuxCD both offer a variety of options; pricing is about $2.

2. Boot into Linux

Once you’re equipped with a Linux LiveCD or USB, you’ll need to make sure the infected computer is turned off, and then turn it on again with the CD or USB installed. This will boot the computer into Linux, completely bypassing Windows and its infection. Again, nothing has been installed — you’re simply using Linux to get the machine running reliably again.

3. Get Antivirus Software

Next it’s time to get the Linux-based ammunition you’ll need to wipe out the malware: antivirus software. I’m going to use ClamAV, my favorite, via ClamTK, which provides a nice graphical front end.

From the main Ubuntu desktop, then, go to “Applications” and then “Ubuntu Software Center.” Choose “Edit” and then “Software Sources.” You’ll be presented with a box entitled, “Downloadable from the Internet,” and you should be sure all four boxes are checked before you click on “Close.”

Next, from the main Ubuntu Software Center page, click on the “Accessories” icon and type ClamTK into the search box. It will be shown as “Virus Scanner,” but if you click on “More Info” you can verify it’s the right package. Click “Install” and wait for it to download.

Once installation is finished, you should launch ClamTK by going to “Applications” in Ubuntu’s main menu, then “Accessories” and “Virus Scanner,” which is how the software will still be shown.

4. Run a Scan

When the ClamTK window opens, click on the “Scan” tab and select the option for a Recursive Scan. Next, you’ll need to tell the software which drive you want to check for viruses, which in this case is the one that includes Windows. Scanning may take some time, but once the infection is found you’ll get the usual options for what to do with it, including quarantine and removal.

5. Return to Normal

Assuming the infection has now been removed, your computer should be clean once again, making it safe to remove the LiveCD or USB and boot back into Windows as usual. As you enjoy your malware-free machine once again, remember that it’s all thanks to Linux. It’s also not a bad idea to keep your LiveCD or USB handy so you’ll be ready for the next time.

Follow Katherine Noyes on Twitter: @Noyesk.

© 2010 PC World Communications

 

By Katherine Noyes
Mon, October 25, 2010

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